Safety First

At Liftex® safety is our top priority and the paramount consideration involved in manufacturing Liftex® slings. It is the responsibility of the user of our slings to establish appropriate safety practices prior to using our slings. Users of slings shall have knowledge on proper methods of rigging and lifting and how they will react under abnormal situations.

All slings manufactured or provided by Liftex® meet or exceed OSHA and WSTDA standards and regulations. With a very few limited exceptions (primarily due to hardware/fitting marking requirements) Liftex® products are also compliant with ASME B30.9 standards and regulations.

PROTECT SLINGS FROM CUTTING: Failure to protect sling from cutting may result in damage, injury or death. Contact us to discuss sling protection options.

NEVER USE A SLING WITHOUT TRAINING

OSHA regulations require responsible work practice. Employee training should include information given in OSHA training literature, ASME B30.9 “Slings” and ASME B30.10 “Hooks” safety standard stating that sling users shall be trained in the selection, inspection, cautions to personnel, effects of the environment, and rigging practices.

ALWAYS COMPLY WITH APPLICABLE FEDERAL AND LOCAL REGULATIONS

Understand all governing laws and safety standards before use of Liftex Slings. OSHA 1910.184; OSHA 1910.5 (c) (1); ASME B 30.9 “Sling” Safety Standards provide important information.


ALWAYS INFORM YOURSELF

Ask your employer for all sling safe use instruction.


NEVER USE ANY SLING IN EXTREME TEMPERATURES

All sling materials have different tolerances. Be sure to find the correct slings for your application's temperatures.

NEVER OVERLOAD A SLING

Understand work load limits and rated capacities. Rated capacities are based on a 5:1 design factor for synthetics and 4:1 for chain slings. Lift dynamics, duty cycle and hitch type may require an increased design factor, hence a reduced WLL. Sling WLL depends on sling leg angle. The WLL for a sling is reduced as the Sling to Load Angle decreases. This fact applies to all multi-leg and basket slings and must not be ignored. Please refer to any of our sections on web sling bridles, round sling bridles, or chain sling bridles which illustrate the effect of sling leg angle on WLL for a single basket and 2-leg sling. The WLL of a sling with a 30 degree leg angle is 50% of the WLL for the same sling with a 90 degree leg angle. Pay attention to the effect of the sling leg angle which can result in sling overload.  When using chain sling as opposed to synthetics the WLL must be reduced when chain is rigged over an edge radius ( R ) less than 2x the chain rod diameter (d). See our section on chain slings for more information.

ALWAYS KNOW THE LOAD WEIGHT

Avoid sling failure. Utilize our section with our capacity charts to determine proper sling configuration and working load limits and any of our sections on bridles for reductions in working load limits and how to calculate the Sling to Load Angle.

ALWAYS BE AWARE OF CHEMICALLY ACTIVE ENVIRONMENTS

Chemically active environments can affect the strength of webbing and chain in varying degrees, ranging from little to total degradation. Before ordering and/or using slings that will be used in a chemically active environment, contact a Liftex® representative. We will be pleased to recommend the right sling for your application.

  • ACIDS

    • Nylon is subject to degradation in acids, ranging from little to total degradation.

    • Polyester is resistant to many acids, but is subject to degradation, ranging from little to moderate in some acids.

    • Chain is subject to degradation in acids. Degradation may or may not be visible. If chain has been exposed to acids it should be removed from service.

    • Each application shall be evaluated, taking into consideration the following: 

      • Type of Acid

      • Exposure Conditions

      • Concentration

      • Temperature

 

  • ALKALIS

    • Nylon is resistant to many alkalis, but is subject to degradation ranging from little to moderate in some alkalis.

    • Polyester is subject to degradation in alkalis, ranging from little to total degradation.

    • Chain is subject to degradation in alkalis. Degradation may or may not be visible. If chain has been exposed to alkalis it should be removed from service.

    • Each application shall be evaluated, taking into consideration the following:

      • Type of Alkali

      • Exposure Conditions

      • Concentration

      • Temperature

ENVIRONMENTAL DATA

Recommended Substance Uses for Nylon & Polyester

CAUTION:  This is a general guideline only.

*Disintegrated by concentrated Sulfuric Acid. 

**Degraded by strong Alkalis at elevated temperatures.

NEVER RIDE A SLING OR LOAD

Additionally synthetic slings should never be used to rig personnel platforms.

NEVER RIG A SLING TO THE LOAD IMPROPERLY

  • Avoid dropped loads or sling damage

  • Sling leg angle shall not be less than 30 degrees from the horizontal

  • Chain Slings shall be shortened with a shortening hook only — NO KNOTS, BOLTS, ETC.

  • Synthetic Slings are not to be shortened at all — if a shorter sling is needed for a job use a different sling that is properly suited for the application

  • Sling legs shall not be kinked, twisted or tied

  • Sling hooks shall not be point loaded

  • Slings used in a basket hitch shall have loads properly balanced

  • Slings shall be securely attached to lifting point

  • Slings in contact with edges, corners, protrusions, or abrasive surfaces shall be protected with a material of sufficient strength, thickness, and construction to prevent damage

  • Sling shall be rigged to prevent chain from sliding over load edge radius

NEVER USE A WORN OUT OR DAMAGED SLING

Remove slings from service if any of the following are present:

  • Missing or illegible identification

  • Wear, nicks, bends, cracks, gouges, or stretching in any hardware or chain

  • Weld splatter on any part of the sling or hardware attachments

  • Excessive wear at bearing points

  • Discoloration from excessive temperatures

  • Chain links should hinge freely with adjacent links

  • End attachments, including hooks, that are cracked, deformed, elongated, or obviously worn

  • Other conditions, including visible damage, that cause doubt as to the continued use of the sling


NEVER USE A SLING WITHOUT A LEGIBLE  IDENTIFICATION TAG

Sling identification is required to insure proper sling selection. Rated capacity is the maximum working load for a specified working range. Slings with missing or illegible tags should be removed from service. Sling working range includes sling leg angles from 90 degrees to specified maximum.

CAUTIONS TO PERSONNEL

All portions of the human body shall be kept from between the sling and the load, and from between the sling and the crane hook or hoist hook. Personnel should never stand in line with or next to the leg(s) of a sling that is under tension. Personnel shall not stand or pass under a suspended load. Personnel shall not ride the sling. Synthetic slings shall not be used to support suspended personnel platforms.